Since our workshop is finally upon us, we decided that today we’d honor our founder, LeAnn Erickson.
LeAnn graduated from the University of Iowa. She is currently Associate Professor of film and video production at Temple  University in the Department of Film and Media Arts and has been an  independent video/ filmmaker for over 20 years. Her work has appeared on  public and cable television, in media and art galleries, and has won  national and international recognition in video/film festivals. She is a  recipient of regional and national production grants for her work  from such funding sources as NEA, the Jerome Foundation and The Leeway  Foundation. Most recently she was awarded the 2003 and 2006 Pennsylvania  Council on the Arts Fellowship for media arts.
LeAnn recently completed a documentary work, Top Secret Rosies, about the secret female mathematicians who helped win World War II. The work she put into this film exemplifies how she is devoted to female empowerment in the industry. This is exactly the reason she created the Reel Girls Film Workshop, to encourage young girls to tell their own stories in a world where their viewpoint is not usually heard. LeAnn is an inspiration to filmmakers, regardless of gender, but especially to women looking for empowering mentors.
You’ll all be very lucky to meet her tomorrow!

Since our workshop is finally upon us, we decided that today we’d honor our founder, LeAnn Erickson.

LeAnn graduated from the University of Iowa. She is currently Associate Professor of film and video production at Temple University in the Department of Film and Media Arts and has been an independent video/ filmmaker for over 20 years. Her work has appeared on public and cable television, in media and art galleries, and has won national and international recognition in video/film festivals. She is a recipient of regional and national production grants for her work from such funding sources as NEA, the Jerome Foundation and The Leeway Foundation. Most recently she was awarded the 2003 and 2006 Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship for media arts.

LeAnn recently completed a documentary work, Top Secret Rosies, about the secret female mathematicians who helped win World War II. The work she put into this film exemplifies how she is devoted to female empowerment in the industry. This is exactly the reason she created the Reel Girls Film Workshop, to encourage young girls to tell their own stories in a world where their viewpoint is not usually heard. LeAnn is an inspiration to filmmakers, regardless of gender, but especially to women looking for empowering mentors.

You’ll all be very lucky to meet her tomorrow!

EVERYONE is a genius. But if you judge a fish on it’s ability to climb trees, it will live it’s entire life believing that it’s stupid.

Albert Einstein

Only five more days until our workshop!

Getting our girls ready to take the media by !!

don’t peak in high school

miceteries:

julihawk:

Teenage girls, please don’t worry a bout being super popula r in high school, or being the best actress in high school, or the best athlete. Not only do people not care about any of that the second you graduate,  but when you get older, if you reference your successes in high school too much, it actually makes you look kind of pitiful, like some babbling old Tennessee Williams character with nothing going on in their current life. What I’ve noticed is that no one who was a big star in high school is also a big star later in life, except athletes. For us overlooked kids, it’s so wonderfully fairI was never the lead in the play. I don’t think I went to a single party with alcohol at it. No one shared pot with me. It wasn’t until I was sixteen that I even knew marijuana and pot were the same thing. My parents didn’t let me do social things on weeknights because weeknights were for homework, and maybe an episode of  The X-Files if I was being a good kid (X-Files was on Friday night), and on extremely rare occasions I could watch Seinfeld (Thursday, a school night), if I just aced my PSATs or something. I had a great time i n high school, but it wasn’t the high school experience you see on teen dramas, where people are in serious romantic relationships, and hanging out in parking lots or whatever (isn’t that loitering?). I had fun in my academic clubs, watching movies with my girlfriends,learning Latin, having long, protracted, unrequited crushes on older guys who didn’t know me, and yes, hanging out with my family. I liked hanging out with my family! Later, when youre grown up, you realize you never get to hang out with your family. You pretty much only have eighteen years to spend with them full-time and that’s it. So yeah, it all added up to a happy, memorable time. Even though I was never a star.  Because I was largely ignored at school, I watched everyone like an observant weirdo, not unlike Eugene Levy’s character Dr. Allan Pearl, from Waiting for Guffman , who famously “sat next to the class clown, and studied him.” But I did that with everyone. It has helped me so much as a writer you have no idea. I just want ambitious teenagers to know it is totally fine to be quiet, observant kids. Besides being a delight to your parents, you will find you have plenty of time later to catch up. So many people I work with—famous actors, accomplished writers—were overlooked in high school. Be like Allan Pearl. Sit next to the class clown and study him. Then grow up, take everything you learn, and get paid to be a real-life clown, unlike whatever unexciting thing the actual high school class clown is doing now. I think our class clown is doing marketing in Warwick, Connecticut.

From Mindy Kaling’s “Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me”

(via theworldgotstill)

OUR WORKSHOP IS NEXT SATURDAY!!!

Speakers confirmed, 20+ students registered… I hope we really inspire some young women that day!

sexismandthecity:

“Responsibility to yourself means that you don’t fall for shallow and  easy solutions—predigested books and ideas…marrying early as an  escape from real decisions, getting pregnant as an evasion of already  existing problems. It means that you refuse to sell your talents and  aspirations short…and this, in turn, means resisting the forces in  society which say that women should be nice, play safe, have low  professional expectations, drown in love and forget about work, live  through others, and stay in the places assigned to us. It means that we  insist on a life of meaningful work, insist that work be as meaningful  as love and friendship in our lives. It means, therefore, the courage to  be “different”…The difference between a life lived actively, and a  life of passive drifting and dispersal of energies, is an immense  difference. Once we begin to feel committed to our lives, responsible to  ourselves, we can never again be satisfied with the old, passive way.”      ―       Adrienne Rich

sexismandthecity:

“Responsibility to yourself means that you don’t fall for shallow and easy solutions—predigested books and ideas…marrying early as an escape from real decisions, getting pregnant as an evasion of already existing problems. It means that you refuse to sell your talents and aspirations short…and this, in turn, means resisting the forces in society which say that women should be nice, play safe, have low professional expectations, drown in love and forget about work, live through others, and stay in the places assigned to us. It means that we insist on a life of meaningful work, insist that work be as meaningful as love and friendship in our lives. It means, therefore, the courage to be “different”…The difference between a life lived actively, and a life of passive drifting and dispersal of energies, is an immense difference. Once we begin to feel committed to our lives, responsible to ourselves, we can never again be satisfied with the old, passive way.”
― Adrienne Rich

(Source: equalityandthecity, via theworldgotstill)

hellogiggles:

take the pledge

http://missrepresentation.org/

zooeydeschanel:

Miss Representation 

(via theworldgotstill)

christinefisher:

madeofair:

6od:

k. I get it, now.

some people get ryan gosling. i get adam scott.

i prefer both.

christinefisher:

madeofair:

6od:

k. I get it, now.

some people get ryan gosling. i get adam scott.

i prefer both.

(via christineariel)

sylvysparrow:

can this movie just get released in orlando already? can’t wait to see it.

(via deepemotionalthoughts-deactivat)

Our schedule has been finalized!

After much planning, we can now announce that the schedule for our November 12th workshop is all set!

8:30 AM – 9 AM: Registration

9 AM – 10 AM: Introduction to Women in Filmmaking – LeAnn Erickson, Rea Tajiri, Natasha Ngaiza

10 AM – 11 AM: Brainstorming Workshop – Nikki Harmon, Leslie Sullivan

11 AM – 11:30 AM: Scriptwriting Workshop – Jenny Deller

11:30 AM – 12 PM: From Script to Screen – Lauren Gural, Astin Sullivan, Alanna Ramsier

12 PM – 1 PM: Lunch

1 PM – 3 PM: Editing Workshop – Erika Mijlin

3 PM – 4 PM: Campus and Program Tours

We are so excited about the lineup!  All of our speakers are very talented and informative, so plan on learning a lot that day!  We’ll be updating our speakers page soon with their background information, so keep an eye out for that!